Saturday, October 25, 2014

Clinton Shows Warren Love, But Doesn't Get Much In Return

Two of biggest names in Democratic politics did their first ever event together on Friday. It was one-sided.



Stephan Savoia / AP



Stephan Savoia / AP


BOSTON — They did not appear on stage at the same time. They delivered their remarks one speaking slot apart. One did not introduce the other. And there were no photo-ops to speak of on Friday for Hillary Clinton and Elizabeth Warren.


At their first joint campaign showing, the two Democrats kept a notable distance.


Clinton, the former secretary of state, and Warren, the U.S. senator from Massachusetts, didn't cross paths in public view at the rally for Martha Coakley, the flagging candidate for governor in this state. But the scene and speeches at Boston's Park Plaza Hotel, where hundreds came to support Coakley, afforded a rare glimpse at the personal and political shades of the Clinton-Warren relationship.


They are two of the party's biggest names, often cast as adversaries in a presidential race to which neither has committed. But before the Coakley event on Friday, the two leading Democrats had never appeared at a public political event together.


The dynamic at the rally would best be described as one-sided.


Light on Clinton, heavy on Warren.


From the beginning of her prepared speech — a 25-minute outline of Coakley's record and a personal appeal for higher wages, better support for working families, and equal pay legislation for women — Clinton went out of her way to praise Warren.


In a series of nods to other officials headlining the rally, including Sen. Ed Markey and Gov. Deval Patrick, Clinton gave a line or two to each person. The last attendee she mentioned was Warren. "And I am so pleased to be here with your senior senator," Clinton said, her voice louder, hitting every word almost too hard, "the passionate champion for working people and middle-class families…"




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Friday, October 24, 2014

What The World Was Like The Last Time The Kansas City Royals Were In The World Series

Ah, 1985.


This is what a mobile phone looked like.


This is what a mobile phone looked like.


Via Motorola


This is what a laptop looked like.


This is what a laptop looked like.


Via thenextweb.com


This is what Windows looked like.


This is what Windows looked like.


Via en.wikipedia.org


This is what an Xbox looked like.


This is what an Xbox looked like.




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Democratic Senator Slams NRA, Republicans Over Ebola Response

Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown blamed the NRA for a lack of a U.S. surgeon general, and Congressional Republicans for cuts to public services.


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A Democratic senator puts the blame for the Centers for Disease Control's slow response to Ebola directly on the National Rifle Association and Senate and House Republicans.


Speaking in a local radio interview on Thursday, Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown blamed the NRA for a lack of a U.S. surgeon general, and Congressional Republicans for cuts to public services.


"We don't have a surgeon general to, to run this, to oversee this, because of the opposition to him brought on by opposition from the National Rifle Association," Brown said.


"So we're not – we have cut spending on public health in this country, um, because some members of Congress, unfortunately a majority in the House, would prefer to do tax cuts for the wealthiest people and cut public services like CDC, like National Institutes of Health, like early childhood education – this wasn't foreseen but some of it could have been prevented if we had people in Washington that really looked out more for the public interest than for their special interests."


Brown called Republican and some Democratic opposition to the president's surgeon general pick "tragic."


"We had one, she resigned, the president made a nomination and the nominee had spoken out about gun violence and the National Rifle Association opposed that man, virtually almost every Republican got in line in the filibuster, and a few people in my party joined the filibuster as a result of the NRA, and I think it's tragic."


The National Rifle Association did indeed propose scoring a vote on Obama's surgeon general nominee Vivek Murthy, due to his support for gun control.


"I wish that were talked about a little more, because that — I don't know that a surgeon general would have been in a place that could have prevented this, but I think with a surgeon general, head of public health in this country, the surgeon general would have had a better-prepared public health response, and I think fewer mistakes would have been made."


Brown took aim at what he called a "bunch of demagogues in Washington" for criticizing the CDC's response.


"Instead, we've got a bunch of demagogues in Washington that are finger-pointing, and saying 'Fire the CDC,' 'It's the President's fault,' all the things that they sort of — one bird flies off a telephone wire, they always do kind of response."


The Democratic senator placed more blame on every Republican and some Democrats who he said were "at the beck and call of the NRA."


"I'm not letting my party off the hook on this — virtually every Republican is at the beck and call of the NRA when it comes to votes on the Senate floor, and a number of people in my party are. So I don't think we got to fifty votes because of that, so I'm not blaming just Republicans here. I am blaming the NRA, and I'm blaming people who say 'Appoint an Ebola czar,' but were not willing to vote for a very, very qualified Surgeon General. It just so happens the Surgeon General said some critical things about gun manufacturers."




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